Tagged: Discipleship

Following Jesus Takes Guts

…and most of the brethren in the Lord, having become confident by my chains, are much more bold to speak the word without fear.” ~ Philippians 1:14

Following Jesus takes guts. It is dangerous. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

We live in a war zone called earth. There are two kingdoms in conflict. You are in one or the other. If you are in the kingdom of God, you will be hated and killed for His name. If you are in the kingdom of darkness, you are serving the interests of the ruler of this world. He is a liar and a murderer. He comes to steal and destroy.

You can lock your doors, but that won’t stop him. You can call on your government to protect you, but that won’t stop him. You can hide, but he will find you. How can you stop the evil one?

A final generation of Christians is coming… and this is what we learn from them about victory: “And they have conquered him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony, for they loved not their lives even unto death.” ~ Revelation 12:11

Notice how they defeated the enemy…

  1. The blood of Jesus covered their sin.
  2. They spoke the truth to the world.
  3. They were ready to die for His sake.

Clearly we are to be different. We don’t fight to survive, but to conquer! To win! And we don’t win by living, but by dying. When we carry a cross we know there’s only one way this is going to end.

Our weapons are nothing like Satan’s… we love our enemies, we bless those who persecute and curse us, we feed those who are determined to destroy us, and we overcome evil with good. We are not here to merely survive, but to plunder the strong man’s house, to release the captives, and to let our light shine in such a way that His name is made great by our words and actions.

We will do whatever it takes and give up whatever it costs to carry the message of the cross to every man, woman, boy, and girl on the planet.

Following Jesus is not for wimps or fair weather fans. Pray for a powerful witness, a tender heart, and an unblinking obedience. Stop making excuses and play hard. Love indiscriminately. Laugh in the face of intimidation and hostility. Long for heaven.

Leadership Expectations as a Source of Pastoral Pain

I’m old enough to recall when “leadership” became the latest buzzword among pastors. The key to being a good pastor was to become a good “leader.” I won’t bore you with the history of how it happened, but gradually we replaced “discipleship” with “leadership” as a primary pastoral objective. (Ironically, the seminary that pioneered secular leadership studies for pastors shifted their focus within a decade, and moved on. But the damage was done.)

I believe the shift occurs when we depart from following Him (the core activity of a disciple) and begin to apply secular organizational definitions and metrics to the church. Pastors and staff are expected to “bump the numbers” and get more bodies in the building. If not, they are “failing.” Period. Time to get a new pastor.

The unintended consequences of the shift have been brutal. Pastors now struggle with the weight of crushing expectations from culture, from the church, and from themselves that are unbiblical and untenable. Overwhelmed and desperate shepherds are shamed into silence. Life is endured – it is never “abundant.”

We need to rethink what we are asking pastors to be and do, but most of us won’t. And consequently, I believe that we will be facing an unimaginable, heart-level tsunami of pastoral pain in coming years. This is only the beginning. We’ve got to change the conversation.

Here’s a start. I wrote this in my journal early last year…

We shepherds are bombarded by external and internal expectations that if we are smart enough and work hard enough, we can build a great church. The weight of those expectations is literally killing the heart of our pastors. Jesus never places those expectations on pastors. He actually said He would build His church when we know Him in a way only the Father can reveal! Consequently, the thing I have to remind myself every day can be captured by these phrases… every step from Him and for Him… every step birthed in prayer and bathed in prayer. He has the plan and He calls me to simply take the next step in that plan… a step He gladly gives when I am ready to abandon everything else to follow Him… a daily journey characterized by a moment-by-moment joyful fellowship with my Master.”

The Walk

1. It is waiting on the Lord who renews and sustains me (Psalm 103:5, Isaiah 40:31).

2. It is a walk He sustains (Psalm. 63:8).

3. It is a walk that originated in the Garden and was damaged and destroyed by sin. Man no longer naturally longs to walk with God. Man would rather wander from God than walk with God (Genesis 3:8-9).

4. It is a walk of faith — looking beyond this existence to another (2 Corinthians 5:7, Colossians 3:1).

5. It is a walk that prefigures my walk in eternity (Revelation 3:4).

6. It is a walk of humility required by God (Micah 6:8).

7. It is a walk of deliverance, conditioned by readiness to maintain daily, practical holiness – avoiding all things unclean and impure and offensive to Him (Deuteronomy 23:9,14; Romans 8:1)

8. It is a walk in His Spirit characterized by (a) His leadership and (b) His fruit (Galatians 5:16-18, 22-23).

9. It is a walk of co-crucifixion – my flesh with its passions and desires have been crucified (Galatians 5:24-25).

10. It is a walk of harmony with the Spirit of God (Galatians 5:25 “keep in step with”).

11. It is a walk of following Jesus – who will give me a desire and ability to fish for the souls of men (Matthew 4:19).

12. It is a walk of love resulting in His continuous presence with me (John 14:23; 2 John 1:6, Ephesians 5:2, Romans 14:15).

13. It is a walk of intimate communion – abiding (John 15:4, 1 John 1:6-7).

Insight: John Newton on Seeking God

Every Christian is on a journey to know God more fully (John 17:3)… but rarely does anyone explain that the path is not an easy one nor is it well-populated. It can be strange and disorienting, especially as you look around and it seems no one else is travelling with you, or that no one else has passed this way before (not true, but it can feel that way).

John Newton (1725-1807), best known as the author of the hymn ‘Amazing Grace,’ in another hymn describes the way our Father draws us near and refines our faith into the finest spiritual “steel”…


I ask’d the Lord, that I might grow
In faith, and love, and every grace;
Might more of His salvation know,
And seek, more earnestly, His face.

‘Twas He who taught me thus to pray,
And He, I trust, has answer’d prayer;
But it has been in such a way
As almost drove me to despair.

I hoped that in some favour’d hour
At once He’d answer my request,
And by His love’s constraining power
Subdue my sins, and give me rest.

Instead of this, He made me feel
The hidden evils of my heart;
And let the angry powers of hell
Assault my soul in every part.

Yea more, with His own hand He seem’d
Intent to aggravate my woe;
Crossed all the fair designs I schemed,
Blasted my gourds, and laid me low.

“Lord, why is this?” I trembling cried,
“Wilt thou pursue Thy worm to death?”
“’Tis in this way,” the Lord replied,
“I answer prayer for grace and faith:”

“These inward trials I employ
From self and pride to set thee free;
And break thy schemes of earthly joy,
That thou may’st seek thy all in me.”

~ John Newton (1725-1807)


Source: Winchell, James M., ed. An Arrangement of the Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs of the Rev. Isaac Watts. Boston: James Loring, and Lincoln & Edmands, 1832.

The Problem-Solving Disciple

Then Jesus lifted up His eyes, and seeing a great multitude coming toward Him, He said to Philip, “Where shall we buy bread, that these may eat?” But this He said to test him, for He Himself knew what He would do. John 6:5-6

Philip was stunned. Jesus was asking where to get the food for thousands of people. Immediately his mind didn’t go to where to get it, but to how much it will cost: “Two hundred denarii worth of bread is not sufficient for them, that every one of them may have a little.

Overhearing Jesus’ question to Philip, Andrew added, “There is a lad here who has five barley loaves and two small fish, but what are they among so many?” Andrew’s mind went to available resources.

John, writing years later about the incident, describes Jesus’s question as a “test.” But what was the test?

  1. To see who could whip out their iPhone and locate the nearest market?
  2. To see who could most quickly calculate the cost?
  3. To see who could conduct a speedy inventory of personal resources and accounts?

Not even close.

Jesus has been preaching, teaching, and healing – both proclaiming the ruling power of God and demonstrating it – and sowing absolute truth into their minds. Now presented with an impossible situation, Philip must apply what he has been taught.

The test exposed the inner working of Philip’s thought life under stress. We say we are trusting Him, but our thoughts tell the real story. Under pressure and experiencing anxiety, Philip’s mind didn’t run to the Father who is the King of kings. He stopped at the walls erected by a worldview chained to the physical senses, but blind to an unseen, spiritual realm. He slid off into a mental pit of self-reliance, rather than rest in the unseen, almighty God.

The Old Testament is full of examples of kings who failed to trust God when confronted with vastly superior military threats. They ran and forged alliances with other nations, placing their faith in the popular, collective wisdom of their generation for deliverance. Over and over again, God allowed His people to discover the hard way that He is the rock, the hiding place, and the refuge in the midst of overwhelming problems. They were being tested.

The mature disciple doesn’t ignore a problem. He is intensely aware of the needs. He can see that his immediate resources are inadequate. But the distinct difference within the mature Christian mind is this: he seeks first the kingdom – or ruling power – of God. His mind escapes the confines of a Western worldview… and runs to the absolute authority and infinite resources of the one Jesus called “Father.”

Jesus simply took what was available, lifted it up to His Father, and said “thank you.” And everything changed.

When tested, the problem-solving disciple has disciplined his mind to go first to the Father. Only in His Presence can we see the truth about ourselves and our problems.

 The name of the LORD is a strong tower; the righteous run to it and are safe. Proverbs 18:10